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deficit, we have big budget-- deficits. people like alan greenspan and ben bernanke gave us the largest downturn since the great depression. that is why we have a huge budget deficit. we didn't have a huge tax cuts. we had stimulus and response to the downturn. we have higher unemployment if we have not had that but let's be clear if we are upset about the deficit greenspan and bernanke, i don't know why we reappointed bernanke. in terms of the entitlement programs, yeah we have a public pension program, which is hugely popular. you look at polling day that-- i was at a conference this morning in social security is over 90%. they ask people would you be willing to pay higher taxes to sustain sosa security benefits and 70 to 80% said yes. i don't see any problem with running a pension program through the public sector. what is the problem with the? it is usually popular. health care costs, medicare again. we are providing medicare health care benefits for seniors. that is also hugely popular. you have these tea party people out there yelling don't let the government touch medicare. they
for banks in the country. host: ben bernanke referred yesterday to short-term political liability for this. guest: i think he is absolutely correct. people tend, under these kinds of conditions, to one to blame someone. the problem with that is there are plenty of people to blame. we deregulated the industry. the congress deregulated the industry. there was a culture, if you will, of deregulation. and this encouraged some of what i call speculative activities that led to the bubbles and then the collapse. yes, you had this reaction. i think it is an overreaction, and the outcome would be -- as you try to blame someone you get worse outcomes rather than better outcomes, and i think that is what the chairman was trying to communicate. host: does the banking committee and the members, are they right to be angry at the fete at all? guest: if they're going to be angry, i think they have to be angry at everyone, including themselves. they allow these organizations to get bigger and more risk oriented. and yes, and regulatory agencies because of this culture -- the regulatory agencies because of
in place. we had hank, ben bernanke tim geithner and sheila bair the head of the fdic. i know a lot of people in finance and a lot of people in business and government. and i can't think of for that would have done a better job of getting us through that. now it's kind of fashionable to look back and pick at one aspect or another of what was happening and our country's financial system froze up during that period. some of you in this room were at a party i was at in september of 2008, one to talk was the money market funds saved. if we have 3.5 trillion fun missile by 30 million people who on is and they might are worrying about whether they can get their money that was half of all the process held by u.s. banks at the time you have a panic. you had commercial paper frees up entirely in the biggest companies of the united states and some are described in this book that worried whether they were going to meet their payroll and a short period of time to read the sixth largest bank in the country in terms of the domestic deposits, washington mutual failed over a weekend. you had the th
benefits expire isn't going to garner bipartisan support. extending -- bernanke jobs version when the president was asked about when he was here asked about mitch mcconnell talking about how they can support, republicans can support nuclear energy and the president's response was, i'm paraphrasing but of course they like those are republican ideas offering in the name of bipartisanship and what's going on here is the reverse, harry reid taking out the one democratic idea. >> do you think helping small businesses grow by allowing them to write off their expenditures is going to -- something that is a democratic idea? you think that the highway trust fund extension is a uniquely space space idea? if you were to break the components of that bill individually each of those would donner strong bipartisan support. so,, i think we are in some ways over reading some of this because again, i think personally i believe that the components of this bill, several components that were in the bipartisan bill but are not in the reid bill will still be bipartisan. i think -- i don't think any of t
. with your support in mr. paulson, mr. bernanke we forced their stearns shareholders from a position that i think was a high of $170 a share in january. we force them down to $2 a share because the american taxpayer money was in the bailout. and that was something that was supported by the fed, by treasury because we felt that because the taxpayer was bailing them out, that the shareholders of bear stearns should not be held harmless. now, you have a different situation here, slightly different. a number of weeks later, where we have aig going under, and these are credit default swaps so the money going into aig is going right out to the counterparties. this is a pass through and the folks on the other side are goldman sachs. that is the principle beneficiary of all this. and we don't negotiate in nickel, not a sense of what they are getting. you are in the same position. you are supposed to be negotiating on behalf of the american people. you were saying the regulations were different. let me tell you something we were changing the rules and regulations every single day. we were taking act
, as you know, ben bernanke and tim geithner are saying a strong dollar is in the interests of the united states, in relation to the other major floating currencies. i say myself, on my part, i fully agree. a strong dollar is in the interests of the united states. i would also say that it corresponds to the overall superiority interest of the global economy as a whole, and certainly of the interest of europe. i echo what they say. i would also say that, as major floating currencies, we have the sentiment that a number of other currencies that are not floating could themselves have a progressive and orderly and timely appreciation. that is the way i see the running of the present situation. in the very long run, we could imagine other solutions, but at the present moment we are running a set of free floating major currencies, and there you have the terms of reference that we agree upon. >> another question? yes, sir. in the front row. >> while every country has its own problems and is thinking of its own solution, how do you see the doha round will succeed? if it would not, what would be t
. the ayes have it. the motion is agreed to. accordingly the house stands >> ben bernanke testifies about the economy and monetary policy. now, secretary lahood. this part of the hearing is 50 minutes. >> let me just raise a couple of questions with you very quickly. the committee has reviewed thousands of complaints regarding sudden acceleration in the toyota vehicles. before the crash thatñossÑçkçñar membersÑiñr of at( family in aut "tsjutÑ. ñrmy questionÑi is, why did it e jjtxdñrÑi to act? &Ñignz+:çóx@%ylñx].sÑiñr why did it take them so long to act? >> mr. chairman, i would say this. i have been in the job more than a year. prior to my time which would have been prior to january 23rd of '09, if there issues i can't answer, i will get back to you for the record. i will tell you this, 30,000 complaints come to nh tsa every year and we look at every one of them. we think every one is important. some come from people who are driving cars and some come from the industry. we look at what's going on from stakeholders and people in the automobile business. sometimes they f
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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